00
:
00
:
00
:
00
Reorder products. See your order history.
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $35 or more.

How to get FREE Shipping:
1. Place your online order of $35 or more*
2. Ship to an address within the United States (including U.S. territories)
3. Your shipment should arrive within 2-6 business days from your order

* Your total purchase must reach the designated amount after any discounts are applied and prior to the costs of shipping and tax.
Order by 6, We'll Ship the Same Day

Domestic orders placed Monday - Friday by 6 p.m. Eastern Time will be packed and shipped the same day, pending verification of billing information and the shipping method selected. International orders and orders containing gift cards, out-of-stock items or refrigerated items will be processed as quickly as possible, but won't necessarily be shipped out the same day.

Excludes all orders placed on major US holidays (Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day).

 

Health Guides
Health Concerns
Vitamin Guide
Herbal Remedies
Homeopathy
Weight Control
Sports & Fitness
Women's Health
Men's Health
Safety Checker
Food Guide
Newswire
Personal Health Tools
 Print this article
 

Once Again, Fish Fats Shown to Fight Heart Disease

Once Again, Fish Fats Shown to Fight Heart Disease: Main Image
Current results suggest that omega-3 fatty acids from fish might prevent stroke
Healthnotes Newswire (December 3, 2009)--More and more, inflammation has been implicated as the culprit in heart and blood vessel diseases, making anti-inflammatory agents such as the omega-3 fats found in fish of interest to researchers. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to play an important role in supporting cardiovascular health, and a new study published in Vascular Pharmacology now reports that lower-than-normal levels of omega-3s were found in people who have suffered vision loss and brain damage as a result of disease in the artery that carries blood from the body to the head and neck (the carotid artery).

Plaques--not good for the arteries

Atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, is characterized by plaque formation in the artery walls. These plaques are thought to be the result of cholesterol buildup, oxidative damage, and inflammation.

The cap of an atherosclerotic plaque can break away from the vessel wall, travel in the blood, and become lodged in a smaller artery: traveling plaques within the coronary arteries can cause a heart attack. Breakaway plaques from the carotid arteries tend to block small arteries in the brain, leading to vision loss, a condition that sometimes precedes a stroke, known as transient ischemic attack, or a stroke.

Low omega-3s associated with more symptoms

Carotid artery plaques from 41 people having surgery to have them removed were analyzed for signs of inflammation and for their fatty acid makeup. Plaques from people with symptoms of vision loss, transient ischemic attack, or stroke, had a higher degree of inflammation and lower levels of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), the two major omega-3 fatty acids from fish, than plaques from people with no symptoms. Levels of omega-6 fatty acids, which are generally considered to be inflammatory, were the same in symptomatic and asymptomatic people.

"Recommendations have previously been made regarding the amount of omega-3 content which may prove to be beneficial for cardiac protection, especially in those at risk," the study's authors said.

More might be the answer

These current results suggest that omega-3 fatty acids from fish might prevent stroke, adding to the evidence from a number of previous studies showing that omega-3 fatty acid consumption prevents cardiovascular disease. Here are some ways to get more in your diet:

  • Follow the advice of the American Heart Association: eat two 3-ounce servings of fatty fish per week. These include salmon, tuna, herring, and mackerel.
  • Include plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids such as non-defatted flax meal, walnuts, and oils from soy, canola, walnut, and flaxseed. These foods can increase levels of the beneficial EPA, and, unlike fish, are generally free of heavy metals and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyl).
  • If you have heart disease or a high risk of heart disease, consider taking a daily fish oil supplement that provides 1 to 1.8 grams of omega-3 fatty acids.

(Vascul Pharmacol 2009; doi:10.1016/j.vph.2009.08.003)

Maureen Williams, ND, received her bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania and her Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine from Bastyr University in Seattle, WA. She has a private practice on Cortes Island in British Columbia, Canada, and has done extensive work with traditional herbal medicine in Guatemala and Honduras. Dr. Williams is a regular contributor to Healthnotes Newswire.
 
sign up. save 10%

invalid email address entered. please try again.

 
almost there! click sign me up for exclusive coupons, great deals, early access to sales and info on how to stay healthy & fit.  view our privacy policy.
*first time customers only