Use your coupon today. $10 off $75 or more. Enter code AUGUST10 at checkout. Online only. Expires 8/25/2014 at midnight.
plus get free shipping on orders over $25. Order by 6 p.m. ET Ships same day. Learn more.
Reorder products. See your order history.
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $25 or more.

How to get FREE Shipping:
1. Place your online order of $25 or more*
2. Ship to an address within the United States (including U.S. territories)
3. Your shipment should arrive within 2-6 business days from your order

* Your total purchase must reach the designated amount after any discounts are applied and prior to the costs of shipping and tax.
Order by 6, We'll Ship the Same Day

Domestic orders placed Monday - Friday by 6 p.m. Eastern Time will be packed and shipped the same day, pending verification of billing information and the shipping method selected. International orders and orders containing gift cards, out-of-stock items or refrigerated items will be processed as quickly as possible, but won't necessarily be shipped out the same day.

Excludes all orders placed on major US holidays (Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day).

 

Health Guides
Health Concerns
Vitamin Guide
Herbal Remedies
Homeopathy
Weight Control
Sports & Fitness
Women's Health
Men's Health
Safety Checker
Food Guide
Newswire
Personal Health Tools
 Print this article
 

Power Up Your Brain with a Multivitamin

Power Up Your Brain with a Multivitamin: Main Image
People taking multivitamins performed better on immediate free recall memory tests
Some of the best advice for preventing memory loss as we age is to stay mentally and physically active. According to a review of the research published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, it might also be wise to take a multivitamin, as it may improve an important type of memory.

Pooling the data on multivitamins and memory

In the review, researchers performed a meta-analysis of the pooled data from ten trials, in which healthy adults were given a daily multivitamin supplement or placebo for one month or more and changes in cognitive function were measured. The multivitamins varied among the studies, but in general they had some combination of B-complex vitamins and small amounts of other nutrients such as minerals, antioxidants, and herbal extracts.

Multivitamins help us remember what we just learned

The report noted the following findings:

  • People taking multivitamins performed better on immediate free recall memory tests. In these tests, people are presented with a list of items and then asked immediately to recall them. The diminishing ability to recall recently learned information is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.
  • Two of the studies in the review tested number facility by having participants count forward and backward in series (for example, by threes). Both studies found that number facility improved more in people taking multivitamins, however a clear effect could not be established through the meta-analysis because the pool of data was too small.

The researchers found that there was not enough data looking at the effects of multivitamins on general cognition, reasoning, or mental speed to demonstrate clear benefits.

"Based on the evidence, it appears that multivitamin supplements may be useful in improving free recall memory in healthy adults," said lead study author Dr. Natalie Grima of Monash University in Clayton, Australia. "Given that the recall of recently learned information is a core clinical feature of probable Alzheimer's disease, future research should investigate the effects of multivitamins in those diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease."

Preserving memory

Based on the findings from this review, taking a multivitamin every morning may be one way to maintain a youthful memory. Here are some other things you can do to protect brain function as you age:
  • Stay active. Remember to give your brain and your body regular workouts.
  • Eat fish. Preliminary research suggests that the omega-3 fats from fish might help to protect brain function.
  • Go for greens. Colorful fruits and vegetables, whether they are green, orange, yellow, red, blue, or purple, provide antioxidant nutrients that are believed to slow age-related changes in cells throughout the body, including in the brain.
  • Consider ginkgo. A number of studies have found that ginkgo can improve memory in people with age-related cognitive decline.

(J Alzheimers Dis 2012;29:561-9)

Maureen Williams, ND, completed her doctorate in naturopathic medicine at Bastyr University in Seattle and has been in private practice since 1995. With an abiding commitment to access to care, she has worked in free clinics in the US and Canada, and in rural clinics in Guatemala and Honduras where she has studied traditional herbal medicine. She currently lives and practices in Victoria, BC, and lectures and writes extensively for both professional and community audiences on topics including family nutrition, menopause, anxiety and depression, heart disease, cancer, and easing stress. Dr. Williams is a regular contributor to Healthnotes Newswire.
 
sign up. save 10%

invalid email address entered. please try again.

 
almost there! click sign me up for exclusive coupons, great deals, early access to sales and info on how to stay healthy & fit.  view our privacy policy.
*first time customers only