Free Shipping on Orders Over $25. Order by 6PM EST and order ships same day
Reorder products. See your order history. Click here.
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $25 or more.

How to get FREE Shipping:
1. Place your online order of $25 or more*
2. Ship to an address within the United States (including U.S. territories)
3. Your shipment should arrive within 2-6 business days from your order

* Your total purchase must reach the designated amount prior to the costs of shipping and tax.
Order by 6, We'll Ship the Same Day

Domestic orders placed Monday - Friday by 6 p.m. Eastern Time will be packed and shipped the same day, pending verification of billing information and the shipping method selected. International orders and orders containing gift cards, out-of-stock items or refrigerated items will be processed as quickly as possible, but won't necessarily be shipped out the same day.

Excludes all orders placed on major US holidays (Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day).

 

Health Guides
Health Concerns
Vitamin Guide
Herbal Remedies
Homeopathy
Weight Control
Sports & Fitness
Women's Health
Men's Health
Safety Checker
Food Guide
Newswire
Personal Health Tools
 Print this article
 

Vitamin E

Also indexed as:E Vitamin, Tocopherol (Vitamin E), Alpha Tocopherol, D-Alpha Tocopherol
Vitamin E: Main Image

How to Use It

The recommended dietary allowance for vitamin E is low, just 15 mg or approximately 22 International Units (IU) per day. The most commonly recommended amount of supplemental vitamin E for adults is 400 to 800 IU per day. However, some leading researchers suggest taking only 100 to 200 IU per day, since trials that have explored the long-term effects of different supplemental levels suggest no further benefit beyond that amount. In addition, research reporting positive effects with 400 to 800 IU per day has not investigated the effects of lower intakes.455 For tardive dyskinesia, the best results have been achieved from 1,600 IU per day,456 a large amount that should be supervised by a healthcare practitioner.

Where to Find It

Wheat germ oil, nuts and seeds, whole grains, egg yolks, and leafy green vegetables all contain vitamin E. Certain vegetable oils should contain significant amounts of vitamin E. However, many of the vegetable oils sold in supermarkets have had the vitamin E removed in processing. The high amounts found in supplements, often 100 to 800 IU per day, are not obtainable from eating food.

Possible Deficiencies

Severe vitamin E deficiencies are rare. People with a genetic defect in a vitamin E transfer protein have severe vitamin E deficiency, characterized by low blood and tissue levels of vitamin E and progressive nerve abnormalities.457, 458

Low vitamin E status has been associated with an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis459 and major depression.460 Women with preeclampsia have been found to have lower blood levels of vitamin E than women without the condition.461

Very old people with type 2 diabetes have shown a significant age-related decline in blood levels of vitamin E, irrespective of their dietary intake.462

Best Form to Take

The names of all types of vitamin E begin with either "d" or "dl," which refer to differences in chemical structure. The "d" form is natural (also known as RRR-alpha tocopherol) and "dl" is synthetic (more correctly known as all-rac-alpha tocopherol). The natural form is more active and better absorbed. Little is known about how the "unnatural" "l" portion of the synthetic "dl" form affects the body, though no clear toxicity has been discovered.

In theory, when a vitamin E supplement is labeled "400 IU" it should have the same level of activity regardless of its source. This is purportedly achieved by using more synthetic vitamin E to reach the same potency as a lesser amount of natural vitamin E. For example, 100 IU of vitamin E requires about 67 mg of the natural form but closer to 100 mg of the synthetic. However, a recent review of the scientific evidence suggests that natural vitamin E probably has greater activity in the body than indicated on the label.463 Natural vitamin E may be as much as twice as bioavailable as synthetic vitamin E, not 1.36 times as is generally accepted.464 Many doctors advise people to use only the natural, the "d" form, of vitamin E.

After the "d" or "dl" designation, often the Greek letter "alpha" appears, which also describes the structure. Synthetic "dl" vitamin E is found only in the alpha form--as in "dl-alpha tocopherol." Natural vitamin E may be found either as alpha--as in "d-alpha tocopherol"--or in combination with beta, gamma, and delta, labeled "mixed"--as in mixed natural tocopherols.

Little is known about the importance of the beta and delta forms of vitamin E, but a debate has arisen concerning gamma tocopherol. In a test tube study, gamma tocopherol was found to be more effective than alpha tocopherol in protecting against certain specific types of oxidative damage.465 In addition, some research has shown that supplementation with large amounts of alpha tocopherol (such as 1,200 IU per day) increases the breakdown, and decreases blood levels, of gamma tocopherol.466

Human trials with vitamin E have almost always been done with the alpha (not gamma) form. Historically the synthetic "dl" form was used in most trials, but some trials are now using the natural form. The issue of alpha vs. gamma form requires more research before it can be fully understood.

Almost all vitamin E research shows that, when positive results are obtained, hundreds of units per day are required--an amount easily obtained with supplements but impossible with food. Therefore, switching to food sources, as suggested by some researchers, is impractical. On the other hand, the vitamin E occurring naturally in food contains gamma tocopherol and other tocopherols. Thus, it possibly may turn out to be more effective than the vitamin E taken in supplement form. Additional research is needed in this area.

Vitamin E forms are listed as either plain "tocopherol" or tocopheryl followed by the name of what is attached to it, as in "tocopheryl acetate." The two forms are not greatly different. However, plain tocopherol may be absorbed a little better, while tocopheryl attached forms have a slightly better shelf life. Both forms are active when taken by mouth. However, the skin utilizes the tocopheryl forms very slowly,467, 468 so those planning to apply vitamin E to the skin should buy plain tocopherol. In health food stores, the most common forms of vitamin E are d-alpha tocopherol and d-alpha tocopheryl acetate or succinate. Both of these d (natural) alpha forms are frequently recommended by doctors. Although the succinate form is slightly weaker than the acetate form, more milligrams of the succinate form are added to supplements to compensate for this small difference in potency. Therefore, 400 IU of either form should have equivalent potency.

Dry powder vitamin E supplements (as alpha tocopheryl succinate or acetate) are sometimes used because they are dispersible in cold water. They may be efficiently absorbed even when taken on an empty stomach or with a low-fat meal. The oil forms of vitamin E may be poorly absorbed unless taken with several grams of fats or oils.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

Learn more about Aisle7, the company.

Learn more about the authors of Aisle7 products.

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

 
sign up. save 10%

invalid email address entered. please try again.

email:
 
almost there! click sign me up for exclusive coupons, great deals, early access to sales and info on how to stay healthy & fit.  view our privacy policy.
*first time customers only